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NGC3184 Image of Supernova 30/3/2016

Roger Samworth

30/3/2016

 

Could someone have a look at NGC 3184 please?

In the image I posted earlier there is apparently a double star just above the nucleus. It is also on my raw images (one is attached flipped vertically) but not on published photos. Again, one is attached.

Thanks,

Roger

 

It seems to be a supernova!

http://www.virtualtelescope.eu/2016/03/28/supernova-2016bkv-ngc-3184-image-24-mar-2016/ (see image from this page below)

Roger

N.B. At the bottom of this page are a pair of revised images from 2/4/16 - these are the images from 30/3/2016 processed slightly differently to enhance the supernova further. The first images you see below are the original ones from 30/3/2016:

Processed image:

ngc3184_Samworth_300316

Raw image:

ngc3184raw_Samworth_300315 snapshot20160331002006

Information on NGC3184:

ngc3184 published_Samworth_300316

Image showing supernova in NGC3184:

NGC-3184_sn2016bkv_24mar2016-640x548

2/4/2016:

By being a bit more selective about the frames in the stack, I managed to improve the definition of the supernova a bit.

It is such an unusual event that it seemed worth doing!

Roger

ngc3184supernova_Samworth_300316a-revised_020416
ngc3184supernova_Samworth_300316b-revised_020416

Supernova statistics

8/4/2016

 

Here are a few sweeping assumptions:

This article 

http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1967BAN....19..239K

says the the average supernova frequency per galaxy is one every 40 years.( The last visible one in the Milky Way was 400 years ago, but that's statistics for you)

Lets assume that you will only be able to see one for every two that goes off

If we assume they remain visible for lets say 30 days, in any given observation, the chance of seeing one is 30/(365X40X2) = 0.001 or 1 in a thousand.

If you observe 40 galaxies a year (that's about what I do), the chances of stumbling across one shorten to 1 in 25 per year (or once every 25 years!)

That's not quite as long odds as I might have expected! Maybe I won't do the lottery after all.

Mind you, I will be 94 next time I trip over one!

Roger

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